How to Roast Garlic

Once you know how to roast garlic in the oven, you are going to want to put it in everything! This easy, two-ingredient recipe will transform any dish that calls for garlic in the best possible way.

Roasted garlic cloves in a jar with a spoon and oil

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Roasted Garlic Recipe 

Don’t get me wrong: I love a complicated recipe when I have the time. 

But sometimes, you just need something super simple. A silver bullet that never fails to impress. 

Roasted garlic is just that. It’s made with two ingredients — fresh garlic and olive oil — and it never fails to add tons of mellow and rich garlic flavor to any dish. 

You can spread it right onto bread, use it in pasta recipes or just about any recipe that calls for garlic. 

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    Why I love this recipe:

    Garlic fans, this recipe for roasted garlic might just change your life, for a few reasons: 

    • Roasted cloves can elevate any dish that calls for fresh garlic. 
    • It only requires two ingredients and a few minutes of hands-on time to make. 
    • You can freeze leftovers to drop into any recipe calling for garlic in the future. 

    Basically, this is one of my favorite ways to add extra flavor to any dish that calls for garlic.

    More oven roasted recipes to try: Oven Roasted Tomatoes | Oven Roasted Okra | Roasted Butternut Squash Soup | Roasted Broccoli with Lemon and Garlic | Roasted Green Beans

    What is roasted garlic? 

    Roasted garlic is a condiment and recipe ingredient made from roasting fresh garlic in the oven at a higher temperature. When roasted, each clove of garlic becomes soft and spreadable and the simple ingredients are elevated.

    It can be used instead of fresh garlic or minced garlic in a recipe and lends a sweeter, caramelized-like flavor to dishes without being overpoweringly potent. It’s one of my favorite recipes to add bold flavors to any dish.

    While the roasting process isn’t super fast, this is a great way to add deeper garlic flavor without that garlicky punch to any dish. And it’s an easy method that is scalable, so you can roast several whole bulbs of garlic in the same amount of time.

    Add it to soups, sauces, salad dressings, pizza, dips, marinades and more, cook it with proteins or mash it, then spread it on bread. That’s absolutely heavenly. 

    Two cloves of garlic on a black cutting board with a knife

    What you need to make this recipe:

    The Speckled Palate participates in affiliate programs. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Please refer to my disclosure page for more information about these affiliate programs.

    Let’s talk ingredients!

    In addition to the tools above, you’re going to need some ingredients to make this recipe, too! Chances are, you might already have some of them in your fridge or pantry. Scroll down to the recipe card for the full measurements and instructions.

    Here’s what you’ll need:

    • Whole garlic bulbs — you’ll need at least one whole head of garlic. I like to roast a few at a time and freeze the extra for later.  
    • Olive Oil — regular olive oil gets my vote for this recipe, but you can use any type of cooking oil, like extra virgin, avocado or even vegetable oil.

    You could add a pinch of salt, too, though I like to hold off on that until I’m using these whole cloves in a recipe.

    The top of a garlic clove is chopped off on a cutting board
    After trimming off the top of the garlic heads

    How to Roast Garlic

    Preheat the oven to 375°F. Measure out a sheet or two of foil, and set aside.

    Use a sharp knife to remove the top of the bulb. Leave the peel on for the time being.

    Discard that, then place the bulb in the center of a piece of foil.


    Drizzle with a little bit of olive oil. The foil will catch any extra that drips off. 

    Then wrap the bulb in the foil, pressing down on the bottom a little to make a little stand so it won’t fall over.

    Pro tip!

    Roast a few heads at a time — you can use it in recipes like garlic herb butter, roasted garlic aioli, cheesy garlic bread and roasted garlic mashed potatoes. You can also freeze it for later. 

    You may place it on a small baking dish or a sheet pan. It can also go straight into the oven like this to bake, so long as you’ve sealed it well.

    Garlic heads wrapped in foil on a sheet pan before baking

    Roast for 45(ish) minutes or until it smells amazing and the garlic is SOFT. The bulb will also turn a golden brown color, thanks to the oil.

    Let the garlic cool, then remove from the foil and squeeze it out of the head of garlic into a storage container. This can get sticky with the papery skin, so go slow.

    You could use a fork or your fingers to individually remove the roast garlic cloves from the pods, if you want them to keep their shape.

    If making it later, place the cloves in a food-safe, airtight container and pop it in the fridge for up to a week. 

    Two whole heads of roasted garlic in foil

    How to remove roasted garlic from the pods 

    If you want it to retain its shape, pick each clove out individually with your fingers or a cocktail fork. 

    For a more spreadable situation, or if you don’t mind them being squished together, just squeeze them out of the garlic bulbs.

    How to store roasted garlic

    To store roasted garlic for later, you can either refrigerate it or freeze it. See freezing instructions below. 

    If storing in the refrigerator, place the cloves in a food-safe, airtight container. Drizzle with more olive oil. Place it in the fridge and use the cloves within a week. 

    How to freeze roasted garlic

    This is one of my absolute favorite kitchen hacks. I roast extra garlic, use the individual cloves that I need for my recipe, then freeze the leftovers with oil or (cooled) melted butter in ice cube trays. 

    Then when you’re ready to use them, you can simply pop a frozen garlic cube into your recipe and let those flavors melt into your dish. Here’s how to freeze it: 

    1. Place individual roasted garlic cloves or a spoonful of the mashed roasted garlic into the cavities of an ice cube tray. 
    2. Cover them in olive oil and freeze until solid, about 12-24 hours. Then pop out the cubes and add them to a freezer-safe container or freezer-safe bag.
    3. When ready to add to a recipe, simply pull out a cube and defrost it in the microwave or add it to a hot skillet and stir it in. 

    The frozen cubes will keep for about 6 months in the freezer, but they’ll taste the best if used within 3 months. 

    Uses for oven roasted garlic

    Roasted garlic can be used any time a recipe calls for fresh garlic. It’s perfect for any garlic lover.

    Here are a few ideas: 

    Roast garlic cloves in a jar on a black marble cutting board

    Erin’s Easy Entertaining Tips

    • Use roasted garlic instead of fresh garlic for any recipe. It changes the flavor slightly to make the end result a bit sweeter and less garlicky. 
    • Make a roasted garlic spread to add to bread for a dinner party. 
    • Keep a stash of roasted garlic in the freezer so you always have some ready to go for any recipe. 
    A jar of roasted garlic cloves with a spoon inside sits on black and white cutting board

    Frequently Asked Questions

    How long will roasted garlic in olive oil last?

    If stored in an airtight container in the fridge, roasted garlic that’s been drizzled with olive oil will last about a week. It can also be frozen into ice cubes, which are best within 6 months. 

    Is roasted garlic better than raw?

    Roasted garlic provides a mellower, less “garlicky” flavor than raw garlic. The heat from the oven helps to caramelize the garlic, giving it a slightly sweet flavor. Roasted garlic can be used instead of raw garlic in most recipes. 

    How long do roasted garlic cloves last?

    If stored properly in the fridge, roasted garlic lasts about 1 week. If stored in the freezer as ice cubes, the roasted garlic is best used within 3-6 months. 

    Roast garlic cloves in a jar with oil and a spoon

    Quick tips and tricks to making the best roasted garlic

    • Make sure to press the bottom of the foil balls against the counter to give them a “stand.” This helps prevent the garlic from falling over in the oven and letting out the important oil that they need for roasting. 
    • Place a sprig of fresh rosemary or a few fresh basil leaves inside the foil to infuse some fresh flavor into the roasted garlic. 
    • Store it in more olive oil in the fridge to help preserve it for up to 1 week. 

    More condiment recipes:

    Here’s how we make this…

    Roasted garlic cloves in a jar with a spoon and oil

    How to Roast Garlic

    Erin Parker, The Speckled Palate
    Once you know how to roast garlic in the oven, you are going to want to put it in everything! This easy, two-ingredient recipe will transform any dish that calls for garlic in the best possible way.
    5 from 44 votes
    Servings 2 whole heads of roasted garlic
    Calories 33 kcal
    Prep Time 5 minutes
    Cook Time 45 minutes
    Total Time 50 minutes

    Ingredients
      

    • 2-3 whole garlic bulbs
    • 2-3 teaspoons olive oil

    As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

    Instructions
     

    • Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with a piece of foil. Set aside.
    • Slice off the tops of the garlic bulbs. You want to be able to see the cloves–this will help you extract them when they’re done roasting, but it also helps the oil seep into the cloves.
    • Place the sliced bulbs onto the foil. Drizzle them with olive oil.
    • Wrap the bulbs in the foil, pressing down on the bottom a little to make a little stand so it won’t fall over. You may roast them on the baking sheet or simply put them directly on the rack in the oven, but PLEASE be sure you’ve sealed it well so it does not leak.
    • Roast at 375°F for 45(ish) minutes or until it is fragrant and the garlic is SOFT.
    • Let it cool, then remove the bulbs from the foil.
    • Squeeze the garlic cloves out of the head of garlic OR use your fingers to individually remove the garlic from the pods, if you want them to keep their shape.
    • Transfer to a food storage container. Drizzle with olive oil. Store in the fridge for up to a week and use in a variety of dishes.

    Notes

    You can roast more whole bulbs of garlic than this recipe states. Simply cut a larger piece of foil. The roast time might be a little longer since there are more.

    How to freeze roasted garlic:

    • Place whole roasted garlic cloves or a spoonful of the mashed roasted garlic into the cavities of an ice cube tray.
    • Cover them in olive oil and freeze until solid, about 12-24 hours. Then pop out the cubes and add them to a freezer-safe ziptop baggie.
    • When ready to add to a recipe, simply pull out a cube and defrost it in the microwave or add it to a hot skillet and stir it in.
    The frozen cubes will keep for about 6 months in the freezer, but they’ll taste the best if used within 3 months.

    Nutrition

    Serving: 1gCalories: 33kcalCarbohydrates: 1gFat: 3gPolyunsaturated Fat: 3g
    Keyword baking tutorial, best roasted garlic, easy roasted garlic, how to cook, how to roast garlic, oven roasted garlic, oven roasted garlic recipe, roasted garlic, roasted garlic recipe, whole roasted garlic
    Course Tutorial
    Cuisine American
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
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    About the Author:

    Erin Parker is a Southern gal living in Texas with her husband and two daughters. She started The Speckled Palate to share what she was cooking as a newlywed… and over the years, it’s evolved to capture her love for hosting. Specifically, the EASIEST, lowest key entertaining because everyone deserves to see their people and connect over good food. Learn more about her

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