Cast Iron Ribeye

Want a steakhouse experience without leaving your house? Learning how to cook a cast iron ribeye (or your favorite cut of steak!) is easier than you think. Plus, cast iron steak makes a delicious centerpiece for any meal. Makes 1 steak (with the option to add more.)

Be sure to check out my Spinach Madeline, Broiled Asparagus with Lemon and Parmesan and Sauteed Greens if you’re in the mood for a delicious recipe to serve alongside these steaks.

Close up of three slices of cast iron ribeye on a white plate with other sides

Who doesn’t love a home-cooked steak?

It’s always been a decadent thing for me, and I’m realizing the older that I get that I really enjoy making our own steaks.

While visiting a steakhouse is never a bad thing, we rarely do it, especially these days.

So we’ve been perfecting our steaks at home.

Now, I’ve already shared how to broil steaks, but I want to share a different cooking method since the summertime is upon us.

Other steak recipes you might enjoy, too: French Onion Steak Pasta | Steak and Sweet Pepper Salad | Steak Flatbread Pizza | Steak Bruschetta with French Onion Marmalade

Looking for a side dish that’s perfect alongside this steak? Check out my side dish recipe index for inspiration!

PERFECT steak every time. No steakhouse required.

Subscribe to receive a printable Steak Temperature Guide!

    An uncooked ribeye steak on a piece of butcher paper with salt and pepper, from above

    What you’ll need to make this cast iron ribeye steak recipe

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    How to sear steak in a cast iron skillet

    Season the steaks

    Pat your steak dry with a paper towel so there’s not extra moisture on it. This is essential so we can get a good crust on the exterior, but also to minimize the splatter.

    Season the steal with salt and pepper. As a rule of thumb, I use 1 teaspoon of salt per pound of steak. Make sure to season all sides of the steak—not just the top and bottom of it. Crack some black pepper on top of the steak, too.

    Cook the ribeye(s)

    Before we cook the steaks, let me tell you something: The cooking time of your steak is dependent on how thick it is. The times I include in this recipe for a 1”-1½” steak. If it is thicker, it’ll need more cooking time, and if it’s thinner, be prepared to cook them for less time.

    Warm your cast iron skillet over medium-high heat.

    When the pan is screaming hot, place the steak in the middle of the hot skillet dry. Please note that you are NOT adding the ghee yet because we want the crust a dry skillet will give us.

    Please note that if you want to make more than one steak, that’s great, but you need to be careful not to overcrowd your pan. Because of this, I recommend cooking the steaks one at a time unless you have a huge skillet.

    Cook the steak for 5 minutes, and then flip it using a pair of tongs. Be careful because the skillet is hot, hot, hot!

    Add a dollop of ghee on top of the steak, and cook for another 2-3 minutes, or until it’s within 10 degrees of your ideal internal temperature.

    Take the steak’s temperature with an instant read meat thermometer to take its temperature. To do this, stick the thermometer’s tip into the middle of the steak, careful not to push through to the other side of the steak, and let it calculate the internal temperature. Don’t do this by eye—let technology help you!

    Remove from the skillet, and transfer to a plate. Cover loosely with aluminum foil, and let rest for 5-10 minutes. This is important to redistribute the juices of the steak. If you cut it too early, all the juices will run out!

    After the steak has rested for 5-10 minutes to allow the juices to redistribute, place it on a cutting board and slice thin.

    Serve with your favorite side dishes, and enjoy immediately!

    Erin’s Easy Entertaining Tips and Tricks

    Cast Iron Ribeyes are a go-to date night meal in our household.

    Not only are they incredibly easy to make, but they look and feel “fancy.”

    You could easily make these for a dinner party, too, though be aware a cast iron ribeye isn’t a make-ahead dish.

    Here are a few tips and tricks for whipping up these seared steaks in no time flat:

    • If you’re serving a crowd, use more than one cast iron skillet to be able to cook more at once. You don’t want to overcrowd your skillet, so be aware that you are going to have to do these in “batches,” but the batches will be faster if you have more than one skillet.
    • Choose side dishes that can be made ahead of time. Our go-to sides for steak are green beans and mashed potatoes. If you’re hosting people (or having a date night at home), pre-make the side dishes so that the only thing that needs cooking are the steaks.
    • Make a compound butter… or use a slice of salted butter to dollop on top of the steak when it’s done, even though it’s perfectly delicious as is.
    Three plates holding seared steak with mashed potatoes, roasted carrots and greens from above

    Frequently Asked Questions

    How Do I Know When My Steak Is Cooked Properly?

    Everyone likes their steak cooked a little different depending on their personal tastes. (I used to request a Medium Well steak, but I’ll happily eat Medium Rare now.)

    Whichever temperature you choose is A-OK, so long as you remember that your steak’s internal temperature will hit the desired temperature while it rests, not while it’s cooking. (If it hits the internal temp while it’s cooking, the steak will overcook on you. Lessons learned, friends.)

    • RARE steak has a cool, red center and will reach the temperature of 125°F.
    • MEDIUM RARE steak has a warm red center and will reach the temperature of 135°F.
    • A MEDIUM steak has a warm pink center and will reach the temperature of 145°F.
    • A MEDIUM WELL steak has a slightly pink center (think very slightly) and will reach the temperature of 150°F.
    • WELL DONE steak is cooked completely through, meaning there is very little pink left in the middle. It will reach the temperature of 160°F

    Remember that the steak will hit the temperature while it’s resting, so remove it from the pan about 5-10°F before the desired temperature.

    Know your ideal temp?

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    How do I take my steak’s temperature?

    Use a digital meat thermometer to make your job easy. Nobody likes guessing when it comes to steak, and guessing incorrectly could lead to overcooked meat, which is the saddest!

    To take your steak’s temperature, poke the thermometer’s tip into the center of the steak. Be careful not to push it all the way through the other side.

    Let the thermometer tell you what the temperature is, and then transfer the steak to a plate and cover if it’s within 5-10 degrees of your ideal temperature or pop it back into the pan for a little more time if you want it more cooked through.

    How Do I Store Leftover Steak?

    Store the steak in a food safe storage container in the fridge if there is any left. I tend to pre-slice my steaks before serving them, so whenever I have leftovers, I let them come to room temperature instead of nuking them in the microwave.

    If you have a whole steak leftover that hasn’t been sliced, leave it that way! You can give it a quick sear in a skillet with a little bit of butter or avocado oil to heat it up the next day.

    Close up of three slices of cast iron ribeye on a white plate with other sides with text saying "Easy Cast Iron Skillet"

    Quick tips for cooking steak in a cast iron skillet

    • Double or triple the recipe for a dinner party! Use a larger sheet pan, and cook all the steaks at the same time. Just be sure to take each steak’s temperature before removing them all from the pan.
    • Store leftover steak in a food-safe container in the refrigerator.
    • Let leftover sliced steak come to room temperature before eating it. Heating it in the microwave will make it tough.
    • Have a whole (unsliced) steak leftover? Store it whole, and sear it in a skillet the next day with a little butter or oil.

    More recipes to pair with this cast iron ribeye steak

    No matter what cut of steak you’re cooking, there are some wonderful dishes that always pair beautifully with it.

    Here are some of my favorites:

    Now who’s ready to learn how to make this goodness?

    Close up of three slices of cast iron ribeye on a white plate with other sides
    Yield: 1 steak

    Cast Iron Ribeye

    Prep Time: 5 minutes
    Cook Time: 6 minutes
    Resting Time: 10 minutes
    Total Time: 21 minutes

    Want a steakhouse experience without leaving your house? Learning how to cook a cast iron ribeye (or your favorite cut of steak!) is easier than you think. Plus, cast iron steak makes a delicious centerpiece for any meal.

    Ingredients

    • 1 lb. ribeye steak (preferably 1 ½” thick)
    • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
    • ½ teaspoon black pepper
    • 1 tablespoon ghee or clarified butter

    Instructions

    1. Warm your cast iron skillet over medium-high heat.
    2. While the skillet preheats, season your steak with salt and pepper.
    3. When the pan is screaming hot, place the steak in the middle of the hot skillet dry. DO NOT add the ghee yet.
    4. Cook for 5 minutes, then flip using a pair of tongs. Add a dollop of ghee to the top.
    5. Cook for another 2-3 minutes, or until it’s within 10 degrees of your ideal internal temperature because it will continue to cook when you remove it from the cast iron skillet.
    6. Remove from the skillet, and transfer to a plate. Cover loosely with aluminum foil, and let rest for 5-10 minutes. This is important to redistribute the juices of the steak. If you cut it too early, all the juices will run out!
    7. When the steak has rested for the appropriate amount of time, slice and serve immediately.

    Notes

    For a 1” steak, I found that 5 minutes on the first side and then 2 minutes on the second side produced a perfect medium rare steak.

    What temperature should my steak be?

    • Rare (cool red center: 125F
    • Medium rare (warm red center): 135F
    • Medium (warm pink center): 145F
    • Medium well (light pink center): 150F
    • Well done (cooked entirely through): 160F

    Please note that the steak will continue cooking after it comes out of the broiler, so remove it when the temperature is within 10 degrees of your ideal temperature.

    How do I take my steak’s temperature?

    Use a digital meat thermometer to make your job easy. Nobody likes guessing when it comes to steak, and guessing incorrectly could lead to overcooked meat, which is the saddest!

    To take your steak’s temperature, poke the thermometer’s tip into the center of the steak. Be careful not to push it all the way through the other side.

    Let the thermometer tell you what the temperature is, and then transfer the steak to a plate and cover if it’s within 5-10 degrees of your ideal temperature or pop it back into the broiler for a little more time if you want it more cooked through.


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    Nutrition Information:

    Yield:

    1 steak

    Serving Size:

    1

    Amount Per Serving: Calories: 1456Total Fat: 112gSaturated Fat: 54gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 54gCholesterol: 419mgSodium: 2379mgCarbohydrates: 1gFiber: 0gSugar: 0gProtein: 113g

    Nutrition facts are an estimate and not guaranteed to be accurate.

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